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Health (Adults)

Hospital volunteer talking to patient

Health

Accessing health services and finding your way around the system can feel complicated. This page includes information and advice to help you get the help you need.  

MyHealth Cambridgeshire and Peterborough

myhealth app

A new app to help people find NHS services in the Cambridge & Peterborough area has been launched by Cambridgeshire and Peterborough CCG. The app is designed for iPhone and iPad and you can download it from the Apple app store.

The app provides up-to-date information about the locations and opening times of a range of health services in the area.

It will show you services which are currently open, and also services which are currently closed, but that will open soon or the next day. Where a service has multiple opening times in a day such as morning and evening, two entries will appear as a choice for users.

Healthy Peterborough

Healthy Peterborough logo

You can find lots of useful information about healthy living on the Healthy Peterborough website.

Strength and balance exercises can keep you stronger for longer

We all want to continue to share our lives with loved ones as we get older, such as playing with grandchildren and socialising with friends. Simple strength and balance exercises twice a week are a proven way to keep you stronger for longer, independent and enjoying the great things in life, whether by joining a class or doing it yourself at home.

For more information on classes and activities in your area, visit the Healthy Peterborough website.

 

Keep colds and flu at bay

The flu vaccine can prevent you from catching flu - so if you are over 65, are pregnant, or have a long term condition that means you’re entitled to a free NHS flu vaccine, then it’s worth making sure you take this up through your GP surgery or some local pharmacies.

Colds and flu share some of the same symptoms (cough, sore throat), but are caused by different viruses. Flu can be much more serious than a cold.

If you're generally fit and healthy, you can usually manage the symptoms of a cold or flu yourself without seeing a doctor. Look after yourself by resting, drinking non-alcoholic fluids to avoid dehydration and avoiding strenuous activity. Painkillers such as ibuprofen or paracetamol can relieve aches and pains.  

There are around 200 viruses that cause colds and just three that cause flu. There are many strains of these flu viruses, and the vaccine changes every year to protect against the most common ones.

Colds cause more nasal problems, such as blocked nose, than flu. Fever, fatigue and muscle aches are more likely and more severe with flu.

You can find more information by visiting

NHS Health Check

What is an NHS Health Check?

The NHS Health Check is a health check-up for adults in England aged 40-74. It's designed to spot early signs of stroke, kidney disease, heart disease, type 2 diabetes or dementia. As we get older, we have a higher risk of developing one of these conditions. An NHS Health Check helps find ways to lower this risk.

How do I get an NHS Health Check?

If you're in the 40-74 age group without a pre-existing condition, you can expect to receive a letter from your GP or local authority inviting you for a free NHS Health Check every five years. In the meantime, you may want to try this online Heart Age test.

You can also find more details about how you get an NHS Health Check on the NHS website

Mental Health

Man on bench with his head in his hands

Mental health difficulties are very common, one in four of us will have problems with our mental wellbeing at some time in our lives. More information can be found on the Mental Health page.

 

Dementia

Elderly man

If you are concerned that a family member has dementia, the first step is to arrange for them to see a GP.  There is a wide range of support available in Peterborough for people with dementia, including advocacy, dementia advisers, dementia cafés, activities, information and peer support.  More information can be found on the Dementia page.

 

Hospital stays and hospital discharge

Lady with carer

If you are recovering from an illness or a stay in hospital you may need some help when you get home.  This could be received from the Reablement Service.  This could be practical help like getting in and out of bed, washing, dressing and making a meal, or helping you to get back on your feet again.

The hospital might arrange for you to have ‘intermediate care’, which is a health funded service and is to provide you with some short term support. 

The Transfer of Care team, based in the hospital, would complete your assessment and referral for Reablement and any Technology Enabled Care that would support your discharge.

You may receive health funded intermediate care.  You can find out more about paying for your own care and support when you leave hospital on our Paying for your own care and support when you leave hospital leaflet.

You can find our more about hospital discharge on the Your care after discharge from hospital page.

You can find out more on the Reablement page and the Assistive Technology pages.

Protecting property of adults being cared for away from home

Local authorities must take all reasonable steps to protect the moveable property of an adult with care and support needs who is being cared for away from home, in a hospital or in accommodation such as a care home, and who cannot arrange to protect their property themselves; this could include their pets as well as their personal property (for example, private possessions and furniture). Local authorities must act where it believes that if it does not take action there is a risk of moveable property being lost or damaged.

For example, protecting property may include arranging for pets to be looked after when securing premises for someone who is having their care and support needs provided away from home in a care home or hospital, and who has not been able to make other arrangements for the care of their home or pets.

NHS Continuing Healthcare

Two nurses in hospital

As part of your social care assessment, it may be identified that you may also need help and support with your health needs for which we can arrange a healthcare assessment. The healthcare assessment will find out if you are entitled to free NHS continuing healthcare.

To be eligible for NHS continuing healthcare, you must be assessed by a team of healthcare professionals (a multidisciplinary team). The team will look at all your care needs and relate them to:

  • what help you need
  • how complex your needs are
  • how intense your needs can be
  • how unpredictable they are, including any risks to your health if the right care isn't provided at the right time

Your eligibility for NHS continuing healthcare depends on your assessed needs, and not on any particular diagnosis or condition. If your needs change then your eligibility for NHS continuing healthcare may change.

Sensory Impairment

Visually impaired lady typing

The term sensory impairment includes visual impairment, hearing impairment and dual sensory loss.

The council's Sensory Support Team is dedicated to supporting adults who have a sensory impairment whether it be their hearing, their vision, or both.  A medical diagnosis is not needed to access support, information and advice.  

You can find out more information on our Sensory Impairment page.

You can also watch a BSL video on what happens when your doctor asks you to see a specialist.

Learning Disability Annual Health Checks

Learning Disability Health Check form

What is an Annual Health Check?

The Annual Health Check scheme is a free, yearly appointment with your doctor (GP) or Practice Nurse, usually near to where you live. In this appointment your doctor or nurse will ask you questions about how you keep yourself well and whether you need any extra help with this. With your consent they will also check your physical health such as your weight, heart rate and blood pressure. They may ask for a urine sample or a blood test and will also look at any medication that you take to make sure that this is still right for you.

The Annual Health Check is a really good time to ask your GP or nurse any questions or worries that you may have about your health.

Who can have one?

Anyone aged 14 and over who has a learning disability is entitled to have an Annual Health Check. You must be on your GP’s ‘Learning Disability Register’ to get an invite through the post. You can check with your GP if your name is on the register and ask to be added if your name is not on there already.

Why do I need an Annual Health Check?

It is important to stay well and look after yourself and be healthy.

Sometimes adults who have a learning disability have poorer physical and mental health than other people, but this shouldn’t always be the case.

Most health problems are simple to treat once you know about them. Your GP can help stop you getting a serious health condition. This is better than waiting until you're ill. Most people have their health check when they are feeling well.

The doctor or nurse can help you to plan how to keep being healthy and can give you information and advice about different things such as diet and exercise.

Do I have to have an Annual Health Check?

No, the Annual Health Check is voluntary so you can choose whether or not to have one.

More information about Annual Health Checks can be found on NHS Choices.

NHS Big Conversation - have your say

Funding for healthcare across Cambridgeshire and Peterborough is under pressure. More people are using services, and NHS resources are limited. This includes staff and money.

NHS Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Clinical Commissioning Group want you to get involved so they can hear your thoughts about healthcare locally through the BIG conversation.

You can read more about the issue, and find out about meetings that are being held, as well as taking a survey by going to their webpage

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