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Bullying: the facts

Many children and young people experience bullying at school and outside of school - but they don't have to put up with it. Almost 45,000 children talked to ChildLine about bullying in 2013. NSPCC figures suggest nearly half of children and young people (46%) have…

Camping safety

A camping holiday can be great fun for all the family. Pitching your tent is one of the least expensive accommodation options for a holiday. Kids love the freedom of staying in a tent: sleeping under the stars, eating simple meals and enjoying the great outdoors.…

Cancer and social care

If you have cancer, your first priority is medical care. But there are people who can help with other aspects of life, such as where to get help with money and benefits. The first person to speak to about social care is your doctor or nurse. They'll be able…

Cancer: end of life care

There isn't any universal advice on how to come to terms with a life-threatening illness.  Each person will deal with their situation in their own way. Some people take on activities and challenges. Others prefer to spend their time quietly with family, friends or on their own. A terminal diagnosis…

Cannabis: the facts

Cannabis (also known as marijuana, weed, pot, dope or grass) is the most widely used illegal drug in the UK. The effects of cannabis vary from person to person: you may feel chilled out, relaxed and happy some people get the giggles or become more talkative hunger…

Care and support: what's changing?

Since the Care Act 2014, the way people receive care and support has changed to be more consistent across England. The changes in the Care Act are designed to put you in control of the help you receive. Any decisions about your care and support will…

Carers' assessments

If you provide care and support to an adult friend or family member, you may be eligible for support from your local council. This support could include being offered money to pay for things that make caring easier. Or the local authority might offer practical support,…

Carers' assessments: what happens next

After a carers' assessment, your council will contact you about its decision. If you have "eligible" needs, your council will talk to you about what help might be available. This will be based on the information you gave them during your assessment. If you do not have…

Carers' breaks and respite care

Your carer's assessment may identify that you need a break from caring from time to time. Equally, the person you care for may also want to have a break without you. See Accessible day trips and activities for help planning their trip. Replacement care and respite care Replacement…

Caring for an alcoholic

If you're a carer for a problem drinker, finding help can be a frustrating experience. People who care for problem drinkers sometimes have to struggle to get the recognition and support they're entitled to. "They have not always been perceived as 'legitimate' carers," says Drew Lindon…
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